For example, some states are located near abundant hydroelectric supplies, while others contain abundant coal resources. The term “energy-related carbon dioxide emissions” as used in the analysis, includes emissions released at the location where fossil fuels are used, not where they are produced.

Between 2000 and 2010, carbon dioxide emissions fell in 32 states and rose in 18 states. However, from 2009 to 2010, only 14 states saw a decrease in emissions, as the United States was rebounding from the recession and energy consumption increased in most states, along with emissions.

The complete analysis, State-level Energy-related Carbon Dioxide Emissions, 2000-2010, can be found at  www.eia.gov/environment/emissions/state/analysis.