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From The Editor - September 2017 - Broken Promises or a Bridge Too Far?

From the time President Donald Trump first appeared in West Virginia during his campaign saying he was going to put miners back to work, the anti-coal movement has been heckling him. The mainstream press published articles questioning and refuting his ability to do this. Anti-coal groups accused him of building false hope for this disadvantaged group that had been left behind as the rest of the world moved toward cleaner energy. They were shocked when they saw miners in the White House with Trump. They jeered as regulations were rolled back, first the Stream Protection Rule (SPR) followed by a lifting of the coal-lease moratorium. The courts issued a stay against the Clean Power Plan. Then, the Trump administration said it would withdraw from the Paris climate accord. He kept his campaign promises.

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From The Editor - July-August 2017 - Restoring Constructive Engagement

Coal Age produced another successful Longwall USA during June. Overall, the technical program was informative and representatives from almost every U.S. longwall operation were on hand. The cover story this month on the Tunnel Ridge mine is based on a presentation they delivered. It will put to rest any debate about underground coal miners embracing technology and the future impacts of automation. Coal Age also recognized the top three U.S. longwall mines. (See Awards, p. 12.) Hal Quinn, president and CEO of the National Mining Association (NMA), delivered a keynote address that was basically a 180° reversal of the speech he delivered just two years ago (See Dateline Washington, p. 8). His message was change is happening and more is on the way.

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From The Editor - June 2017 - China Can’t Lead the Way

The U.S. announced that it would withdraw from the Paris climate accord as expected at the beginning of June and begin negotiations to either re-enter or negotiate an entirely new agreement with more favorable terms. (See News, p. 13.) During the December 2015 U.N. Climate Change Conference in Paris, parties reached an agreement to combat climate change. In September 2016, the U.S. formally entered the Paris agreement under the former administration. The current administration estimates that complying with the Paris climate accord would cost the U.S. economy nearly $3 trillion over the next several decades.

Environmental activists immediately cried foul and demonstrations were held in some urban centers. Moderates in the mainstream media also tried to guilt the tech-savvy crowd by suggesting that, if the U.S. pulled out of the agreement, China would lead the way and leave America behind. That is complete nonsense.

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From The Editor - May 2017 - Committed to the Coal Business

You may not have noticed it, but a change has taken place. There was a slight change to the masthead (that column of fine print to the right) and the title below my signature is now different. Late last year, I formed a new company, Mining Media International Inc. based in Jacksonville, Florida, and purchased Coal Age along with Engineering & Mining Journal (E&MJ) and other mining-related properties from Mining Media Inc., the Denver, Colorado-based company that has owned the titles since 2003. The title publisher was added to editor-in-chief below my signature.

Shortly after MINExpo 2016, the former owner, Peter Johnson, expressed an interest in selling the titles. In a friendly transaction, he sold them to Mining Media International at the beginning of the year. The similarities with the company names were intentional. Our hope was to implement as smooth a transition as possible for our readers and the advertisers that support the titles. For the last four to five months, we have been working to separate these businesses and their respective intellectual properties (databases, websites, etc.). Now that Mining Media International Inc. has been firmly established, we are making changes to improve operations.

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Coal’s Connection to Current Events

 People unfamiliar with the energy sector may see coal mining as an outdated, dirty business, that is if they see it at all. More recently, the coal business keeps hitting social media newsfeeds. Much of the limelight has been cast by the new Trump Administration, but an interconnected world economy and geo-political affairs has also shown the importance of this dirty, outdated commodity.

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